74% of employees are open to a new job – despite the fact that many of them are satisfied in their current one, according to the latest 2016 Jobvite Job Seeker Nation Study released by Jobvite. Employees are concerned in the short term (39% say it’s harder to find a job than the year before), but optimistic (44%) in the long run.

Satisfaction

According to the report, job seekers have mixed feelings about the job market – but most of them are always open to the prospect of a new job. 74% of job seekers are satisfied with their jobs (especially younger men (85% of them) and married people (80%). 20% have a neutral attitude toward their job, and only a small percentage (6%) describe themselves as dissatisfied.

45% of employed workers are not actively seeking but are open to a new job.

51% of workers are satisfied, but open to a new job.

Millennial males are more likely to be satisfied and open (70%).

The Jobvite study also explored how often people change jobs. It goes from other report that 42 percent of millennials expect to change jobs at least every one to three years. Married people (50%) and people aged 55 (72%) and over are more likely to stay at a job for more than 10 years.

And to find that perfect job, employee referrals reign supreme. 24% say that employee referrals helped them find their most fulfilling job. However, for women in the middle of their careers, internet job boards are a strong resource, with 20% of women aged 30-39 citing them as the source of their most fulfilling job.

Mobile is Here to Stay

Using mobile devices in the job search is steadily increasing – across social media channels, the use of mobile for job-seeking activity has increased only recently.

People who use their phones to look for a job are comfortable doing so anywhere, anytime!

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Social Media’s Place in the Job Search

Jobvite also found that social media continues to be a great tool in job search  and Facebook has the upper hand. 67% of social media job seekers use Facebook; only 35% use Twitter. Besides, 59% used social media to research the company culture of organizations they were interested in.

Different channels are more successful for certain activities than others:

Twitter: Best for looking up current employees to understand experience/skills .

LinkedIn: Best for finding mutual connections for networking (20%) and getting a sense of company leadership (8%).

Facebook: Best for browsing photos and content to get a sense of company culture (21%) and understanding brand reputation (14%).

Still, there’s one crucial mismatch – job seekers are on Facebook, while recruiters are on LinkedIn:

– 67% of those who used social media to find their most recent job used Facebook. Only 35% used Twitter.

– Meanwhile, Jobvite’s Recruiter Nation survey found that 87% of recruiters use LinkedIn, but only 55% use Facebook.

Jobvite’s 2015 Recruiter Nation report revealed that 92% of recruiters are using social media in their outreach. Job seekers are aware, and are becoming more careful about what their profiles reveal:

– In the past year, they have modified their privacy settings – Facebook (23%) and LinkedIn (10%).

– And deleted specific content – Facebook (13%) and LinkedIn (10%).

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About The Study

On behalf of Jobvite, the polling company, Inc., conducted a nationwide online omnibus survey of 2,305 adults (aged 18+), of whom 1,386 were participants in the U.S. labor force. The survey was fielded February 5-8, 2016. Respondents for this survey were selected from an opt-in panel, and had expressed prior consent to participate in online surveys. Data was weighted so the demographics of this audience closely match the nationwide population of adults (age 18+) with respect to gender, age, and region.